Posted in Health and Well Being

Bulk Billing kids under 12

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 30 June 2018
Bulk Billing kids under 12

It is pretty common to get a phone call from the school every few weeks, telling you that your little man or little lady has turned up again, saying something is hurting and as parents we often know when things are minor and to push on, but there are times when all we need is a little reassurance.  We need to make sure the cough is not a pneumonia, the ear drum isn't about to burst or the tonsils are just red and not full of a bacterial infection.

At Whole Medicine we know this happens all the time and in the past we didn't have the availability to offer this service to you as our community, but now we do. We want to be there to support you and your family through these mini challenges, because how we teach kids about health when they are sick has been shown to offer long term benefits to health habits in the future. Reiterating good health habits makes all the difference when kids are young and reinforces key message regarding health behaviour and health management.

So we as a team have decided to offer our families Bulk Billing for kids under 12 years of age, for all those acute 'on the day' appointments.  We all know, kids get sick often, kids fall over all the time, kids hurt themselves in all sorts of ways. As their little immune systems get stronger, as their coordination and skills start to get better, we will be there for all those time when they bump heads, roll their ankle or cough all the way through the night.

See website www.wholemedicine.com.au for details.

Book an online appointment

Posted in: Children's Health Health and Well Being Family GP  

Out with the old pap, in with the new

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 30 June 2018
Out with the old pap, in with the new

Well it has been a long time coming and the new "pap smear" test has arrived. It won't be called a pap smear now, as the technology has changed, so it is now officially called  a "cervical screening test", but that doesn't roll off the tongue, like a pap test does, so colloquially the term pap test will stick around for now.

So what does this mean for women....

Over the last few decades medical science has found that most women who go onto develop cervical cell changes have an associated human papiloma virus (HPV for short) infection. This infection often doesn't have symptoms and can pass between partner without anyone being aware.

There are over 100 different subtypes of HPV but we have identified that only a few will give you a higher risk of developing abnormal cells. The abnormal cells become the risk factor for cervical cancer, a cancer that we want to avoid.

The new test aims to pick up about 30% more cancer risk than the previous screening test. So this is very good news.

The pap smear was a test that took a small scrapping of cells from the cervix, these cells were taken to the lab to be analysed, if there were abnormal cells, we used to either watch carefully, or do a procedure to remove those cells before they become dangerous.

The screening test now looks for the different subtypes of the HPV virus. If the woman doesn't have the dangerous, high risk HPV subtypes she is very unlikely to go on and have abnormal cells. In addition over the last decade we have introduced the cervical cancer immunisation schedule, which is further lowering the risk for HPV infection in women overall.

Because the association between cervical cancer and HPV is so strong, if you don't have the dangerous types of HPV, you don't need as regular follow up. If you do, we follow you up more closely, offer further testing and can define the risk a lot more clearly.

The good news about all of this for our women is that the "pap test" is officially been taken over by the cervical screening test and that this test requires screening every 5 years, instead of every 2 years in the past. Testing commences at age 25 years and goes through to 74 years.

More information can be found here: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/cervical-screening-tests

Contact Whole Medicine today to make an appointment 03 5986 4229.

Posted in: Women's Health Preventative Medicine Health and Well Being Family GP  

Time flies after baby arrives

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 6 June 2018
Time flies after baby arrives

This article will appear in the Mornington Peninsula Magazine June 2018 Addition.

Whole Medicine Article in Mornington Peninsula Magazine

Time moves quickly after the arrival of your cherished baby, and as a new mum there's much to learn. What nappies to use? What signs to look for regarding over-tiredness? How to navigate the world of breastfeeding? It can be a confronting and challenging time albeit an exciting one.

The good news is there are lots of positive things you can do to optimise your baby's health and transition from a child-free adult to a healthy and capable Mum. That's where Whole Medicine can help.

Modern research shows that by looking after the gut biome of small babies and toddlers, you can help children optimise their immunity, support allergy tendencies, lower lifetime risk of some chronic diseases and even aid intelligence. A Whole Medicine six-week baby check includes heart, vision, tummy and hip health assessments, plus offers immunisation schedule navigation, optimising feeding support and arrangement of any necessary specialist follow-ups. It is also an important time for mums to have a check-up and make sure they're on track after giving birth. Issues such as post-partum health, infection, breast care, mental health and sleep are all assessed.

New mothers require even more nutrients during breastfeeding than during pregnancy. Whole Medicine offers you the opportunity to check on common nutrient deficiencies and support you through this period because personalised and researched supplementation may be important for you depending on your dietary needs, family history and lifestyle factors.

The caring doctors at Whole Medicine take great pride in offering you this vital six-week check-up service to ensure your and your baby's health are optimised during this exciting but vulnerable time of life. They also welcome new patients and families.

Book your online appointment today.

Posted in: Women's Health Children's Health Health and Well Being Family GP  

Is your inner critic letting you down?

Posted by Caroline Hales on 4 June 2018
Is your inner critic letting you down?

Self-talk can be described as that continuous narrative that occurs between the conscious and subconscious levels of our mind and body. It is a part of the mind that rarely shuts down, and is so familiar that we often aren't aware of these thoughts.

The messages can be benign, positive or negative in nature, and are experienced in our physical body as comfortable or uncomfortable sensations.

Our habitual reaction is often to shut down uncomfortable thoughts and sensations because we believe they may have negative consequences. Our desire for self-preservation leads us to assume that comfort is the safer option. We tend to experience these habitual reactions more acutely when we are about to say or do something outside of our usual routine or comfort zone, and they can manifest as an increased volume and intensity of negative mind messages, as well as physical body sensations such as tension, anxiousness, or a foreboding feeling that something bad is going to happen.

A simple way to work with these habitual patterns of thoughts is by bringing awareness to the body's sensations and movements -  our jaws, shoulders, stomach and back can tighten - as a response to the mind messages that are being filtered through. Rather than trying to figure out the content of the messages, we can simply begin to witness what is occurring, use breathing patterns to purposely relax our physical body tension, and harness the power of our mind to calm and assure ourselves that, right now in this moment of time, we are safe. This simple practice can have a profound and uplifting effect on the mind-body.

Negative self-talk becomes more engaged when we judge ourselves as having made a mistake, get things wrong, when we think that life should be any different to what it is right now. It can be a habitual response to turn inward and berate ourselves. Being gentle and accepting that part of being human is to make mistakes, get it wrong and to remind ourselves that often we can learn so much from these times, can reduce the intensity and hold of these negative thought pasterns.

Making a choice to speak to ourselves with positive self-talk, i.e. reassuring words and affirmations, bringing our self into the safety of the present moment with kindness. This reassuring response can contribute to building self-confidence, self-belief, and can calm our emotional reactions and support us through difficult times.

Remembering our innate goodness as a human being, engaging in deep breathing exercises, and using reassuring self-talk, offers a chance to move on faster, make amends, and to make new positive choices.

Self-talk is one of the topics that we will be covered in Caroline Hales and Dr Michelle Woolhouse's upcoming Courageously Me Women's Retreat, running from 27th - 31st August 2018. Caroline and Michelle share a passion for empowering women, and together they offer a unique blend of Western and Eastern healing methodologies and philosophies, many years of professional expertise, as well as many years of intensive spiritual and personal development work. For more information, or to book your place in this retreat, please email info@gawler.org or call 1300 651 211.

Posted in: Women's Health Health and Well Being  

The flu jabs have arrived

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 28 May 2018
The flu jabs have arrived

Some facts

Vaccines are the most effective way to prevent the spread of influenza in the community. Every year the virus adapts to it's environment, meaning the vaccine needs to adapt too to maintain its virulence. 

Last year the 2017 flu season was with worst we have seen in years, prompting new recommendations for the community. 

The flu vaccine doesn't contain live virus, so you can't get the flu from having a flu shot.

Taking good quality probiotics along side your vaccine has been shown to improve the immunity you get from it.

When is the right time to get the flu shot?

The government are concerned that because of the hype from last year's flu season, people are getting the flu shot too early. If you get the shot too early your immunity may start to wane in the early spring, just when the virus is starting to develop new strains and new defences.

So when is the right time to get a shot?  Now is the perfect time to get your protection up to date.

Is there anything else I can do to help protect me from the flu?

People with chronic disease are more likely to get the flu, so it makes sense to try to be as healthy as can be, eating a whole-food plant based diet, regular exercise, good sleep habits and optimising nutrient levels go a long way to supporting your internal immune system.

Who is eligible?

Eligible for all over age 65 and those with certain chronic conditions, speak to your doctor. For a full list if eligibility click here.  At Whole Medicine we are bulk billing your flu shot appointment, however there is a fee of $20 for the vaccination if you aren't eligible for a free one.

Will I feel poorly after I get the shot?

Some people report feeling a mild cold like feeling for a few days after the flu shot. To prevent this try taking some extra vitamin C and zinc both before and after the vaccination, this will help you get back on track quicker.

Where do I get it?

We stock the vaccine in clinic, so simply make an appointment by calling 5986 4229 or book online.

 

Posted in: Women's Health Preventative Medicine Men's Health Children's Health Chronic Illness Health and Well Being Family GP  

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