Posted in Preventative Medicine

Whole Medicine - What is an integrative GP?

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 25 July 2018
Whole Medicine - What is an integrative GP?
Integrative medicine is a philosophy of health that focuses on the individual patient and combines conventional western medicine with evidence-based natural medicine and therapies within the current mainstream system.

An Integrative GP reaffirms the significant relationship between the doctor and the patient. It is a complete emphasis on the whole person. Integrative medicine isn't alternative medicine as it is informed by the latest scientific evidence, and it makes use of all available and researched therapeutic interventions, other regulated health care professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and well-being.

It takes into account the physical, psychological, social, emotional, environmental and spiritual wellbeing of the person with the aim of using the safest and evidence-based treatments available for optimal long term health.

To find out more or to book an appointment contact our friendly team at Whole Medicine on 03 5986 4229.

Posted in: Women's Health Preventative Medicine Men's Health Children's Health Chronic Illness Health and Well Being Family GP  

Integrative approach to local health care

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 20 July 2018
Integrative approach to local health care

This article will appear in the Mornington Peninsula Magazine August 2018 Addition.

Whole Medicine Article in Mornington Peninsula Magazine

Mornington Peninsula residents now have access to one of the country's most modern medical clinics Whole Medicine. The medical practice was relaunched earlier this year after being founded as Peninsula Holistic General Practice in 2009. Founder and principal GP Dr Michelle Woolhouse says: "Whole Medicine takes an integrative approach to health care. This means using a combination of general practice with evidence-based holistic principles to help men, women and children be well."

Dr Woolhouse obtained her medical degree from Monash University in 1996 and is a fellow of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. She is also a fellow of the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine and has post-graduate training in hypnotherapy, acupuncture and mind-body medicine.

Whole Medicine provides a range of family GP services, preventative medicine, skin health treatments, community health talks, mind and body retreats and more. Dr Woolhouse explains. "Our health philosophy is to address the whole spectrum of a person's life, including emotional, physical, mental and environmental factors. We are passionate about helping local families and businesses take a holistic and comprehensive approach to health."

Professor Avni Sali AM, director of the National Institute of Integrative Medicine, says: "This is modern medicine. It is not just about trying to treat a person's cancer, ulcer or asthma; we are looking at the whole person." The team of highly qualified GPs who have additional expertise in evidence-based natural medicine offer patients longer, interactive consultations and work with them to help uncover their best self. The clinic includes modern rooms, an in-house dispensary, onsite minor surgery and skin care facilities and easy access to specialists, hospitals, procedures and investigations if required.

To book an appointment at Whole Medicine call 03 5986 4229.

Posted in: Women's Health Preventative Medicine Men's Health Children's Health Skin Health Chronic Illness Health and Well Being Family GP  

New guidelines for prostate cancer screening

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 30 June 2018
New guidelines for prostate cancer screening

Thanks to the rising media attention, most men are aware prostate cancer is on the rise. But yet most guys do not know what they need to do to screen for the disease and make sure they don't have it.

New guidelines have been put out to help guide men in the screening process.

A screening program is not a perfect test. It is designed to pick up the majority of abnormalities without being too invasive or causing any risk of harm. This is why we screen often to increase the chances of picking up the disease in it's early stages. The up side of this is that a screening program is a very safe thing to undertake, the down side is that a small percentage of cases are missed.

In prostate cancer screening, there is another issue,  that we might pick up diseases that would not have evolved into a significant disease, putting people at risk of having to undergo treatment for a disease that was never going to amount to much.

So should men get tested?

So for those that wish to be screened, and are willing to take the risk of being over diagnosed should take the test.

What age should you start the screening program?

It is recommended for those men that don't have a family history of prostate cancer, the screening starts at aged 50.  For those that do have a family history screening starts earlier. Please talk to your doctor about what age is appropariate for you?

What does the screening test involve?

Well this is the most important factor, most men know that the old way to screen for prostate cancer is a digital examination of the back passage but the good news is this has been changed.  That's right, there is no need to do a rectal examination to men that don't have symptoms of prostate disease. All that needs to be done for those men who wish to be check out is a simple blood test.

So come in and make an appointment to see the doctor to discuss this very important screening opportunity.  Contact Whole Medicine on 03 5986 4229.

Be well

Posted in: Preventative Medicine Men's Health Chronic Illness Health and Well Being Family GP  

Out with the old pap, in with the new

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 30 June 2018
Out with the old pap, in with the new

Well it has been a long time coming and the new "pap smear" test has arrived. It won't be called a pap smear now, as the technology has changed, so it is now officially called  a "cervical screening test", but that doesn't roll off the tongue, like a pap test does, so colloquially the term pap test will stick around for now.

So what does this mean for women....

Over the last few decades medical science has found that most women who go onto develop cervical cell changes have an associated human papiloma virus (HPV for short) infection. This infection often doesn't have symptoms and can pass between partner without anyone being aware.

There are over 100 different subtypes of HPV but we have identified that only a few will give you a higher risk of developing abnormal cells. The abnormal cells become the risk factor for cervical cancer, a cancer that we want to avoid.

The new test aims to pick up about 30% more cancer risk than the previous screening test. So this is very good news.

The pap smear was a test that took a small scrapping of cells from the cervix, these cells were taken to the lab to be analysed, if there were abnormal cells, we used to either watch carefully, or do a procedure to remove those cells before they become dangerous.

The screening test now looks for the different subtypes of the HPV virus. If the woman doesn't have the dangerous, high risk HPV subtypes she is very unlikely to go on and have abnormal cells. In addition over the last decade we have introduced the cervical cancer immunisation schedule, which is further lowering the risk for HPV infection in women overall.

Because the association between cervical cancer and HPV is so strong, if you don't have the dangerous types of HPV, you don't need as regular follow up. If you do, we follow you up more closely, offer further testing and can define the risk a lot more clearly.

The good news about all of this for our women is that the "pap test" is officially been taken over by the cervical screening test and that this test requires screening every 5 years, instead of every 2 years in the past. Testing commences at age 25 years and goes through to 74 years.

More information can be found here: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/cervical-screening-tests

Contact Whole Medicine today to make an appointment 03 5986 4229.

Posted in: Women's Health Preventative Medicine Health and Well Being Family GP  

The flu jabs have arrived

Posted by Dr Michelle Woolhouse on 28 May 2018
The flu jabs have arrived

Some facts

Vaccines are the most effective way to prevent the spread of influenza in the community. Every year the virus adapts to it's environment, meaning the vaccine needs to adapt too to maintain its virulence. 

Last year the 2017 flu season was with worst we have seen in years, prompting new recommendations for the community. 

The flu vaccine doesn't contain live virus, so you can't get the flu from having a flu shot.

Taking good quality probiotics along side your vaccine has been shown to improve the immunity you get from it.

When is the right time to get the flu shot?

The government are concerned that because of the hype from last year's flu season, people are getting the flu shot too early. If you get the shot too early your immunity may start to wane in the early spring, just when the virus is starting to develop new strains and new defences.

So when is the right time to get a shot?  Now is the perfect time to get your protection up to date.

Is there anything else I can do to help protect me from the flu?

People with chronic disease are more likely to get the flu, so it makes sense to try to be as healthy as can be, eating a whole-food plant based diet, regular exercise, good sleep habits and optimising nutrient levels go a long way to supporting your internal immune system.

Who is eligible?

Eligible for all over age 65 and those with certain chronic conditions, speak to your doctor. For a full list if eligibility click here.  At Whole Medicine we are bulk billing your flu shot appointment, however there is a fee of $20 for the vaccination if you aren't eligible for a free one.

Will I feel poorly after I get the shot?

Some people report feeling a mild cold like feeling for a few days after the flu shot. To prevent this try taking some extra vitamin C and zinc both before and after the vaccination, this will help you get back on track quicker.

Where do I get it?

We stock the vaccine in clinic, so simply make an appointment by calling 5986 4229 or book online.

 

Posted in: Women's Health Preventative Medicine Men's Health Children's Health Chronic Illness Health and Well Being Family GP  
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